dip


dip
dip vb 1 Dip, immerse, submerge, duck, souse, dunk are comparable when meaning to plunge a person or thing into or as if into liquid.
Dip implies a momentary or partial plunging into a liquid or a slight or cursory entrance into a subject
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the priest shall dip his finger in the blood— Lev 4:6

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dip a dress in cleansing fluid

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dip into a book

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she had dipped in the wells of blissful oblivion— Meredith

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Immerse implies that the person or thing is covered by the liquid or buried or engrossed in something
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immerse the persons being baptized

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immerse a dress in boiling dye for several minutes

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immerse oneself in thought

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I am at present wholly immersed in country business— A d dison

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Submerge implies complete and often prolonged immersion (as in an inundation) or a being overwhelmed or, sometimes, overpowered and made helpless
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the submarine submerged

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several houses were completely submerged by the flood

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the last and most violent religious rebellion . . . seemed likely to submerge that monarchy— Belloc

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It may suggest a sinking to the lowest state, grade, or status personality had been submerged by organization— W. P. Webb

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almost unheard of for such a girl to enter into relations with a man of that submerged class— Mencken

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Duck implies a sudden plunging and an almost immediate withdrawal
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I say, duck her in the loch, and then we will see whether she is witch or not— Scott

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ducked into a doorway to avoid a bore

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Souse adds to duck the suggestion of more prolonged immersion and often of a thorough soaking
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the boy was soused before he was freed from his captors

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a blazing caldron in which Beelzebub is sousing the damned— Arnold

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after being soused in the Atlantic ocean— Aldrich

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Souse sometimes implies steeping of meat, fish, or other food in a pickle or tart liquid for the sake of preserving and flavoring it
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soused mackerel

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It may often imply not only immersion but a being saturated and, hence, after liquor drinking a becoming intoxicated (came home night after night thoroughly soused)
Dunk in its basic use means to dip and soak something (as bread or a doughnut) in coffee, tea, or milk before eating it, but in many contexts it is equivalent to duck or immerse
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men dangling from lines, being dunked in the cold sea as the ship rolled— Cronk

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2 Dip, bail, scoop, ladle, spoon, dish mean to remove a liquid or a loose or soft substance from a container by means of an implement (as a pail, spoon, or scoop). They are often followed by up or out.
Dip suggests the process of plunging the utensil (usually called a dipper) into the substance and lifting it out full; it is the preferred word when the labor involved is to be implied or the action is described
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dip drinking water from a spring

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dip into one's memory for facts one has nearly forgotten

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Bail is used chiefly in reference to something (as a boat) in which water has accumulated or is accumulating; it implies emptying or an attempt to empty by means of repeated dipping
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bail the water out of a rowboat

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by the help of a small bucket and our hats We bailed her [a boat] out— Dana

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Scoop, ladle, spoon throw the emphasis on the kind of implement employed in an operation consisting usually of dipping, conveying, and pouring.
Scoop suggests a shovellike implement, either a small kitchen utensil for dipping out loose dry material (as flour, sugar, or coffee beans) or for gouging out pieces of a soft substance (as cheese) or a much larger and heavier implement used in digging or excavating operations or in the removal of a heap of things from one place to another
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scoop out three cups of sugar

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scoop up the catch of fish into barrels

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scooping gravel from the pit into waiting trucks

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Ladle implies the use of a ladle, or long-handled implement with a bowl-shaped end and often a pouring lip; it is especially used of substances which are liable to be spilled
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ladle soup into bowls

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ladle out the punch

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The term sometimes implies the use of a mechanical device for removing and conveying liquid (as molten metal) from one container to another.
Spoon implies the use of a spoon in lifting and depositing something (as food or medicine)
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the girl who spoons out vegetables in the cafeteria

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slowly spooning up the hot soup

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Dish implies transference to the individual plate or dish of a portion of food (as by ladling or spooning)
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dish out the vegetables

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dish up the ice cream

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New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • DIP — may refer to: Contents 1 As a three letter acronym 1.1 In science and technology 1.1.1 In computer scie …   Wikipedia

  • Dip — Dip, n. 1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. The dip of oars in unison. Glover. [1913 Webster] 2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch. [1913 Webster] 3. a hollow or depression in a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dip — Dip, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dipped}or {Dipt} (?); p. pr. & vb. n. {Dipping}.] [OE. dippen, duppen, AS. dyppan; akin to Dan. dyppe, Sw. doppa, and to AS. d?pan to baptize, OS. d?pian, D. doopen, G. taufen, Sw. d[ o]pa, Goth. daupjan, Lith. dubus… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dip — [n1] submersion in liquid bath, dive, douche, drenching, ducking, immersion, plunge, soak, soaking, swim; concept 256 dip [n2] something for dunking concoction, dilution, infusion, mixture, preparation, solution, suffusion, suspension; concepts… …   New thesaurus

  • dip — ► VERB (dipped, dipping) 1) (dip in/into) put or lower briefly in or into. 2) sink, drop, or slope downwards. 3) (of a level or amount) temporarily become lower or smaller. 4) lower or move downwards. 5) Brit. lower the beam of (a …   English terms dictionary

  • dip — [dip] vt. dipped or occas.Now Rare dipt, dipping [ME dippen < OE dyppan, to immerse < Gmc * dup , to be deep: see DIMPLE] 1. to put into or under liquid for a moment and then quickly take out; immerse 2. to dye in this way 3. to clean… …   English World dictionary

  • Dip — Dip, v. i. 1. To immerse one s self; to become plunged in a liquid; to sink. [1913 Webster] The sun s rim dips; the stars rush out. Coleridge. [1913 Webster] 2. To perform the action of plunging some receptacle, as a dipper, ladle. etc.; into a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dip — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Según el contexto, dip se puede referir a: Mitología un perro vampiro propio de la mitología de Cataluña. Gastronomía la salsa con la que se mojan ciertos aperitivos. Electrónica un tipo de encapsulado de circuitos… …   Wikipedia Español

  • DIP — index immerse (plunge into), subside Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 DIP …   Law dictionary

  • dip — s.n. Cuvânt de origine engleză, utilizat în gastronomie pentru sos rece de consistenţa unei paste în care se înmoaie diferite alimente în formă de bastonaşe (tije de legume, grisine) înainte de a fi consumate. Trimis de gal, 04.05.2005. Sursa:… …   Dicționar Român


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